WordPress Cheat Sheet for developers

WordPress Cheat Sheet for developers

This WordPress Cheat Sheet should be enough to get you started developing or tweaking WordPress themes.

Basic Template Files
style.css Style sheet file
index.php Home Page file
single.php Single post page file
archive.php Archive or Category file
searchform.php Search form file
search.php Search content file
404.php Error page file
comments.php Comments template file
footer.php Footer content file
header.php Header content file
sidebar.php Sidebar content file
page.php Single page file
PHP Snippets for Header
Title of the site
Title of the specific post or page
The style.css file’s location
Pingback URL for this site
Location for the site’s theme files
WordPress version for the site
Atom URL for the site
RSS2 URL for the site
Exact URL for the site
Name of the site
HTML version of the site
Charset parameter of the site
PHP Snippets for Templates
Content of the posts
Check if there are posts
Shows posts if posts are available
Closes the ‘while’ PHP function
Closes the ‘if’ PHP function
Header.php file’s content
Sidebar.php file’s content
Footer.php file’s content
The date in ’08-18-07′ format
Link for the comments on the post
Title of a specific post or page
URL of a specific post or page
Categor of a specific post or page
Author of a specific post or page
ID of a specific post or page
Link to edit a specific post or page
Links from the blogroll
Comment PHP file’s content
List of pages of the site
List of categories for the site
URL to the next post
URL to the previoust post
The built-in calendar
List of archives for the site
Next and previous post links
Site’s description
Navigation menu
Category Based Navigation
Pages based Navigation
Extra stuff
Custom permalinks
Include any file
Value for search form
Prints out message
Displays the register link
Displas the login/logout link
Divides the content into pages
Cuts off the content and adds a read more link
Meta for administrators
Time to load the page
Queries to load the page
The Loop

 

Facebook Pixel Is About To Get A Bit Smarter

Facebook Pixel Is About To Get A Bit Smarter

Your Facebook pixel will now be sending some more data in order to improve your ads delivery and reporting, 

If you visited a Facebook Ads account recently, you will have noticed an alert about your Facebook pixel, saying that it will soon be sending “additional event data,” in order to improve ads delivery and reporting. Specifically, the notification says:

Enhancements to the Facebook pixel: To improve ads delivery and reporting, the Facebook pixel will start sending additional event data, including button clicks and related page metadata. These changes will take effect May 20.

The move comes almost two months after Facebook retired its old tracking code in favor of the Facebook Pixel that is active today, and will go into effect on May 20 for Facebook pixels created before April 20. For any Facebook pixels created after that date, the change will come into effect immediately. But what does it really mean?

Well, for one, Facebook is enhancing its pixel to make its ads delivery more relevant to audiences. This also affects the usefulness of ads, with “more contextual information from [websites], as Facebook will be able to better understand and categorize the actions that people take on [websites] to optimize for ads delivery.”

The information includes actions like “add to cart” or “purchase” clicks, as well as data about your page’s structure. This will, of course, help Facebook contextualize those actions, possibly even allowing it for foresee actions based on available page data.

How to Migrate to SSL with your WordPress Site

How to Migrate to SSL with your WordPress Site

According to various search engines, such as Google, secure websites will be held in higher regards when determining rank. This means that your site could be rated higher if it begins with the “HTTPS:” prefix. This is because secure socket layers protect visitors from several types of fraud by encrypting the transmission of data. It makes it far more difficult to “snoop” and steal information in this manner. When you want to protect your users while simultaneously improving the search ranking of your pages, installing a WordPress SSL certificate is one of the easiest and cost efficient ways.

How Much Extra Are SSLs Per Year?

The actual cost of the SSL certificate will vary from one hosting provider to the next. You’ll also need to take into consideration which SSL you need. For example, a standard certificate for personal and business websites could be significantly less when compared to higher security offered for eCommerce.

Installing the SSL on Your WordPress Site

Installation of the WordPress SSL certificate is relatively simple. In fact, there is very little coding or changes involved on your side. In a very short amount of time, you can offer secure pages to your visitors while improving your online authority. While you could manually make changes for redirects, it’s much simpler if you utilize the right plugin.

Getting the SSL

To start, you need to purchase the SSL from your hosting provider. You can easily find out what is required to install a SSL certificate on your account with GreenGeeks. Some services will allow you to transfer the certificate from third parties. However, it’s probably a good idea to make sure you don’t already have one available. If you have a different hosting plan, you could have been set up with the SSL as a default. You find this out by contacting your web hosting provider.

Installing the SSL

Once you have purchased the SSL, it needs to be installed. This is done by deciding which domain will have the certificate. If you have a hosting account with unlimited domains and maintain more than one website, you’ll need to choose which is getting the new SSL.

Using a Plugin to Make the Necessary Changes

Using a plugin can take a great deal of the work out of using the SSL for your site. Many of these will automatically make the necessary changes once your certificate has been purchased. Some will set up the site just by activating the plugin without requiring additional input from yourself. Here are a few of the best SSL plugins for WordPress:

Really Simple SSL

This plugin requires no additional setup outside of installation and activation. It will automatically make the changes to the .htaccess file if the SSL is detected on your site. You can also view the configuration settings of what has been controlled by the plugin.

CTW SSL for CLoudflare

For those who use Cloudflare for their SSL, this plugin will automatically install all needed changes as well as prevent a common problem of redirecting loops. This is another one of those plugins that will make the appropriate changes once it has been installed and activated.

WP Force SSL

WP Force SSL is a plugin designed to prevent pages and posts from being accessed through HTTP rather than the secure HTTPS. It automatically redirects all traffic of your site to the correct certificate-driven content. This plugin will make the necessary adjustments for you.

Modifying Your WordPress Settings

After installing the plugin to govern your SSL, it’s time to change the settings in WordPress. Go to the “Settings” section of your dashboard. Here, you will see a text box for “Site Address.” Make sure your domain’s prefix shows “https.” This will help the redirect of your secure content and will solve a few problems with posts and pages not showing correctly.

Modifying the .htaccess Page Manually

Should you want to modify the .htaccess manually, the coding is quite simple. Just open the file in an editor and enter the following lines:

 

Setting up a WordPress SSL certificate is less troublesome than what you might think. It can help visitors feel confident in your pages while enhancing how the world views your site in search engines. Think of the expense as a way to enhance the marketing capabilities of your website. Your content could be more readily available in comparison to competitors just by having the SSL installed on the domain.

What kind of security measures do you have on your WordPress site? Do you think the extra cost per year is worth the security and effort of the SSL?

PHP vs. Java

PHP vs. Java

PHP or Java—which language is right for your software project?

PHP is one of the most mature, ubiquitous server-side scripts on the web. Java is a general purpose, compiled programming language designed with one mantra in mind—”write once, run anywhere.” Both power dynamic web applications and sites, with their own strengths and nuances.

Once you choose a language for your software project, it can be pretty difficult to change gears unless you perform a major overhaul down the line. That’s why choosing the right language up front is imperative to building a scalable, successful site that accomplishes your business goals.

You’ve probably done a little research into the right language, but it can be difficult for someone without software development expertise to determine which one is right. Here’s a look at two of the most popular programming languages, Java and PHP. A software developer can help you best decide between the two based on your project, but here are some basics to help you make the right decision.

What is Java?

Java was designed as a general purpose programming language for building standalone applications. When Java was released by Sun in 1991, it was initially being used to program consumer electronics like VCRs.

Java is a compiled language, so when you compile the code it’s turned to intermediate binary for the specific operating system running your software. Its applications are compiled into bytecode that can run on implementations of the Java Virtual Machine (JVM). The JVM helps bridge the gap between source code and the 1s and 0s that the computer understands. Any machine that has the JVM installed can run Java.

In development, Java is primarily a server-side language for the web and the programming language of choice for mobile development on the Android platform. It also still has a decent presence on the front-end as a Java applet, although this is falling out of favor due to security concerns.

What is PHP?

PHP (Hypertext Preprocessor) is a general-purpose scripting language that quickly became the de facto server-side language of choice for web developers after its initial release in 1995. It’s got an advantage in that it was designed and created for the web, versus languages that were adapted to the web (like Ruby or Python). Today, a majority of websites run on PHP, and PHP programmers are still in high demand thanks to its role as the foundation for content management systems (CMS) like WordPress, Drupal, and Joomla and a number of modern frameworks like Laravel, Symfony, and CakePHP that have accelerated development with this mature language.

PHP and Java Differences

Let’s take a closer look at some of the major differences between these two languages.

  • Compiled vs. Interpreted. Java is considered a compiled programming language. This allows it to run on any operating system regardless of where it was written. The difference is in the implementation: Java is compiled into bytecode and run on a virtual machine. PHP is what you call an interpreted language, or “script”—the code can be run as-is in their respective runtime environments (i.e., the server). While there’s a lot of nuance to the compiled vs. interpreted debate, it is generally true that scripts are much easier to use and favor programmer productivity.
  • Memory safe. Java is a memory-safe language, which means if you attempt to assign values outside of the given array parameters, the programmer receives an error.
  • Static vs. Dynamic Type Checking. Java uses static type checking, where the type of a variable is checked at compile-time. The programmer must specify the type (integer, double, string, etc.) of any variable they create. There are many pros and cons for these two paradigms, but the primary advantage of static type checking is that type errors are caught early in development, and because the compiler knows exactly what data types are being used, code typically executes faster or uses less memory. The primary advantage of dynamic type checking is programmer productivity—you are free to assign types at your leisure.
  • Concurrency. This is the language’s ability to handle the execution of several instruction sequences at the same time. Java makes use of multiple threads to perform tasks in parallel. PHP, like most server-side languages, uses multi-threaded, blocking I/O to carry out multiple tasks in parallel. For most use-cases, both methods work just fine, but Java is generally faster because thread to thread memory sharing much faster than interprocess communication (IPC). PHP has been around the block for a while though and has found its own way to achieve asynchronous processing—most notably through the HHVM project released by Facebook.
  • Class-Based vs. Prototype Based. Java follows class based inheritance—a top-down, hierarchical, class-based relationship whereby properties are defined in a class and inherited by an instance of that class (one of its members).

PHP vs. Java: Major Similarities

Let’s take a closer look at some of the major similarities between these two languages.

  • Back-End Development. Both languages are used on the server-side. Java has long been used to power back-end technologies like Apache, JBoss, and WebSphere.
  • Syntax. Looping structures, classes, defining variables, and conditional operators are very similar in both languages. This makes it easy for developers to work cross-platform should you have several projects that use both languages.
  • Entry points. When your program starts, the compiler or interpreter looks for where it needs to begin execution.
  • Object-Oriented Programming (OOP). Neither language is “fully” object-oriented, but both languages have access to techniques like inheritance, encapsulation, and polymorphism. The benefit? Object-oriented languages make your program much more modular so you can reuse code for other programs.

Should I Use PHP or Java for my Next Project?

As with all languages, the choice really boils down to what you’re trying to build and what resources you have at your disposal.

You should consider Java if your project involves…

  • Android Apps
  • Enterprise Software
  • Scientific Computing
  • Big Data Analytics
  • General Purpose Programming of Hardware
  • Server-Side Technologies like Apache, JBoss, Geronimo, GlassFish, etc.

You should consider PHP if your project involves…

  • Software stacks like the LAMP stack (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP)
  • CMS’s like WordPress, Drupal, or Joomla etc.
  • Servers like MySQL, SQL, MariaDB, Oracle, Sybase, and Postgresql etc.

Both Java and PHP are excellent foundations for a wide variety of software. Which language you choose to use will be determined by what you want to be developed.

You can manipulate hardware with Java, but it’s not a common language for low-level programming since it’s a “safer” language. Because Java won’t allow you to perform certain functions to protect the PC, it’s preferred for higher level applications.

The best way to make a firm decision is to post your project and ask developers for their opinions. They can tell you which language is right for your project to help guide you to the right solution.

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