How Many Links Does It Take To See SEO Result

How Many Links Does It Take To See SEO Result

When you start a search engine optimization (SEO) campaign, you’ll probably be eager to see results as quickly as possible. You might be pushing the growth of your startup, or making up for lost time in the digital marketing front.

You know that links are your best tool for building domain and page authority, which in turn will make your site more likely to rank for relevant searches, and you also know that SEO takes a long time to develop. But if you’re going to invest all this time and effort, you want to know exactly how many links it will take before you start to make progress.

So how many links does it take to move your site up the ladder?

Key Link Variables to Consider

First, you need to understand that not all links hold the same value. Links work for SEO because they serve as third-party markers of trustworthiness; the link pointing to your site will fluctuate in value based on its nature, location, and relevance.

These are some key variables to consider when evaluating the “value” of a link:

  • Source strength. The biggest factor here is the domain authority (and, to a lesser extent, page authority) of your link’s source. Trustworthy sources that link to your site will make your site seem more trustworthy than sources that are new or low quality. You can use tools like Moz’s Open Site Explorer to check the domain authority of your sources. Generally, the higher the number, the more powerful effect you’ll see from the link. Aim for links that come from sources with a DA higher than your website’s current DA.
  • Domain diversity. The value of links from a given domain has diminishing returns with each link after the first. That is to say, in general, from a purely SEO perspective, it’s better to have a single link from each of three different domains than it is to have three links from one domain—even if that source has a high DA. Therefore, the diversity of sources that currently link to you will also play a role in how many total links you need to see a benefit.
  • Target page. Links pointing to your site will pass authority to your domain as a whole, but they’ll also pass authority to the individual page they specify. If you use the majority of your links to target one specific page, such as a high-quality content post, that page will rise in rank faster than it would if you used a variety of internal pages to link to. In general, it’s better to go for the diversity; otherwise, you might trigger a red flag for spam, but if you’re looking for fast results for a specific page, this may be a good strategy.
  • Keyword associations. The anchor text of your inbound links doesn’t matter nearly as much as it used to, but there’s still something to be said for keyword associations between your off-site content, your off-site publishers, your anchor text, and the nature of the work you’re linking to. These variables can significantly influence how a link portrays your internal pages’ relevance.
  • Delay. You should also be aware that building a link to your site won’t immediately boost its authority; Google needs time to crawl and evaluate those links, so it might be weeks or longer before you see the effects.

Other Variables to Consider

On top of the variability of “link power,” you’ll also need to consider these other variables:

  • On-site factors. Links are powerful, but they won’t be the only factor affecting your domain and page authority. On-site factors, including the structure of your website, the depth and quality of your content, and other page-level factors, will also affect how your campaign develops. This could significantly hasten or slow the process depending on how much time you spend on it.
  • Existing authority and positions. If you’re just starting an SEO campaign, you’ll probably be able to see quick results; your DA will be low, and just about any new inbound link will help you improve that position. If you’re already ranking highly, with a respectable DA, it’s going to take more links to move you further up the ladder; you’re up against much stiffer competition when you’re ranking on the first page of Google search results.
  • Additional links. When you build a link, you’ll be introducing a new population segment to your on-site content. That, in turn, can fuel the development of even more inbound links. A single reference point can lead to an explosion of new reference points, amplifying the power that a link can have under the right conditions.
  • Competition. You’ll also need to consider how much competition you’re facing, and the keywords you’re trying to target. If you’re going after a number one position for a high-traffic keyword, it could take hundreds or thousands of links to get you there, on top of perfect on-page optimization and other factors. On the other hand, a low-traffic long-tail keyword could be easy to snatch up.

Time and Effort

Overall, it’s nearly impossible to calculate the “number” of links required to see results, because links aren’t the only variable in the ranking algorithm. Instead, your results are going to be dependent on the amount of effort you put in (including the quality, diversity, and targets of your links) and the amount of time you put in (allowing your authority to develop naturally).

The more time and effort you put in, the faster you’ll see results—but “fast” in the SEO world is often at least several weeks. Try not to focus too much on link quantity. Instead, focus on acquiring the best links you can for your domain, on a consistent basis. The results will manifest over time with continued effort.

Top 8 tips to improve local SEO

Top 8 tips to improve local SEO

While Search Engine Optimization tactics have been around for more than a decade, some businesses continue to make missteps in the area. Especially when it comes to a local SEO strategy. Here are eight tips to strengthen the approach.

 

Here are 8 steps from Top Local marketers on the web.

 

1. Insert Keywords Across Multiple Listings 

Making your brand visible through a variety of local listings is important to local SEO. Insert your local keywords into unique descriptions across multiple listings, make sure that your photos are current, and always include your business category. Once you compile a list, promote it: Reviews are essential not only to boost rankings but also to encourage viewers to take action.   – Ahmad KarehTwistlab Marketing

2. Get Local Coverage 

The best way to improve your SEO is to appear in major publications since these are indexed high on Google. If you’d like to improve your local SEO, target top local publications for coverage and create and foster relationships with local journalists who will cover your news on an ongoing business. Once you get that coverage, you’ll notice these links will help improve your local SEO immensely.   – Ayelet NoffBlonde 2.0

3. Get New, High-Quality Links 

The quantity and quality of links directed to your website have an increasingly impactful effect on its local search engine rankings. Consider giving a presentation to business students at a local university, lead a discussion at regional business organization meetings or publish an article online, and use those opportunities to have the associated organizations link to the company’s website.   – Jody ResnickTrighton Interactive

4. Improve Internal Linking Structure 

Most local businesses have poor website architecture, often with important pages only being linked to from the main navigation or footer. Add internal links where relevant from within your pages’ content, including blog posts, informational pages, and key service pages. We consistently see lifts in rankings (maps and organic) after improving websites’ internal linking structure.   – Kyle SandersCWR SEO

5. Optimize Title Tags With Local Keyword 

To help specific pages rank locally, optimize your title tags with the local keyword. For example, your title tag could be “basement renovations Chicago.” This signals to search engines that this page is directly tied to Chicago, and will thus be more likely to show up in searches from your geographic area and explicit searches for the local term.   – Brock Murrayseoplus+

6. Claim And Optimize Your Google My Business Profile 

One of the simplest things you can do to improve your local SEO is claiming your Google My Business profile. This is a business listing that shows up for local searches. You need to have a physical location and street address (not a P.O. box) to set up or claim a listing. Optimizing this profile with the category, contact information, images and business hours gives a big boost in local search.   – Chris DreyerRankings.io

7. Create Local Business Profiles 

Make it easier for searchers to find you by establishing a presence on popular review sites for your industry such as Google+, Yelp and Yellow Pages. Each local profile you create acts like another “platform” for local visitors to land on. It’s an incredible opportunity to improve local SEO and demonstrate social proof, which will help drive people back to your website.   – Solomon ThimothyOneIMS

8. Multi-Local Brands Should Build Hyper-Localized Content 

For multi-local brands, focus on developing hyperlocal content. Many brands have the same location page content for all locations. Instead, make every location page unique. Don’t just find and replace the city name. Do some research. Make it useful, relevant and engaging to each location’s neighborhood.   – Dan GoldenBe Found Online

 

 

WordPress Cheat Sheet for developers

WordPress Cheat Sheet for developers

This WordPress Cheat Sheet should be enough to get you started developing or tweaking WordPress themes.

Basic Template Files
style.css Style sheet file
index.php Home Page file
single.php Single post page file
archive.php Archive or Category file
searchform.php Search form file
search.php Search content file
404.php Error page file
comments.php Comments template file
footer.php Footer content file
header.php Header content file
sidebar.php Sidebar content file
page.php Single page file
PHP Snippets for Header
Title of the site
Title of the specific post or page
The style.css file’s location
Pingback URL for this site
Location for the site’s theme files
WordPress version for the site
Atom URL for the site
RSS2 URL for the site
Exact URL for the site
Name of the site
HTML version of the site
Charset parameter of the site
PHP Snippets for Templates
Content of the posts
Check if there are posts
Shows posts if posts are available
Closes the ‘while’ PHP function
Closes the ‘if’ PHP function
Header.php file’s content
Sidebar.php file’s content
Footer.php file’s content
The date in ’08-18-07′ format
Link for the comments on the post
Title of a specific post or page
URL of a specific post or page
Categor of a specific post or page
Author of a specific post or page
ID of a specific post or page
Link to edit a specific post or page
Links from the blogroll
Comment PHP file’s content
List of pages of the site
List of categories for the site
URL to the next post
URL to the previoust post
The built-in calendar
List of archives for the site
Next and previous post links
Site’s description
Navigation menu
Category Based Navigation
Pages based Navigation
Extra stuff
Custom permalinks
Include any file
Value for search form
Prints out message
Displays the register link
Displas the login/logout link
Divides the content into pages
Cuts off the content and adds a read more link
Meta for administrators
Time to load the page
Queries to load the page
The Loop

 

7 very important SEO specific areas for colleges and universities

7 very important SEO specific areas for colleges and universities

For marketers in the education vertical, Here are some helpful tips to get your site optimized in time for admissions season.

July typically means a new fiscal year for colleges and universities, bringing with it new marketing plans and goals for the upcoming educational year. Where does SEO fit into your higher education marketing plan this year? Hopefully, right at the top.

Earlier this year, Chegg Enrollment Services and the National Research Center for College and University Admissions (NRCCUA) conducted a survey of 726 high school students researching universities. Online searches ranked as the top method used by prospective college applicants to discover universities and programs, and the second most popular method used both during and after the admissions process.

However, higher education faces its own set of unique challenges for SEO. University websites are often segmented by school, program or department. This can result in many contributors to the SEO process, often without a singular roadmap to follow across the organization. Additionally, it’s not uncommon for the university’s IT department to own web development, sometimes creating a backlog for technical SEO changes that need to be made.

I’ve worked with many colleges and universities on SEO, and the problems can certainly be unique compared to other industries. I recorded a webinar about those challenges earlier this month, and I pulled out the primary points to share. As you begin to prioritize your higher education marketing plan and the specific SEO tactics you’ll tackle this upcoming year, here are the seven top areas that I see as some of the greatest challenges in SEO for universities, and also the areas that need the most attention.

1. Perform an SEO audit

Before you can improve on your organic rankings, you have to first understand what needs to be done. Performing an SEO audit will help you to identify and prioritize tactics. That’s especially important when some of the tactics involve technical site changes that involve the IT department. Often a university IT department will have a backlog of requests and site changes.

Tools like Screaming FrogahrefsSEMrush and Deep Crawl provide measurements on a variety of SEO ranking factors and are helpful to ascertain the SEO health of your website.

2. Think ‘mobile-first’

Google has announced that in the coming months, it will be implementing “mobile-first” indexation. Essentially, this means that the mobile version of a website, rather than the desktop version, will be considered the default version for Google to create and rank its search listings (even for desktop users).

This shift to mobile first may pose a problem for universities — often, multiple websites and content management systems are pulled together under one overarching domain. That often means that some parts of the university’s website may be mobile-ready, while others are not.

Remember, too, that Google’s mobile-friendly testing tool works on a page-by-page basis. So don’t trust that just because one page of your university’s site is mobile-friendly, all of them are. Make sure mobile is prioritized for your site this year.

3. Review your keywords and how you’re integrating them into site content

While there are many areas of the university website that may be outside your control, most marketing departments do control the site’s content.

It’s not uncommon for colleges and universities to name a degree or program with a brand name that might not match the search keywords a prospective student will use in a search query. And while Google is getting better at semantics, it’s not perfect. Help Google learn the connection by integrating keywords and brand terms.

For example, my own degree is actually in “Human Communications” from James Madison University. What does that mean? Over the years, I dropped the word “human” from the degree on my resume because it confused so many people. The intent of the university had likely been to separate mass communications (journalism and the like) from other communications (public relations, alternative dispute resolution). But if I were a student today searching for a degree in public relations, would I know to use the term “human communications?” Would Google know that human communications and public relations degrees are the same?

Consider the terms you’re using on the page. Even if the branded degree is “B.S. in Human Communications,” you can write content that incorporates important keywords that define the degree, such as “The Bachelor of Science in Human Communications is a degree incorporating public relations and corporate communications.”

Other programs and degrees may need regular keyword review because the terminology changes over time. Google reported that 15 percent of queries last year were queries that had never been seen before. That’s nearly a million new, unique queries every day! Consider reviewing and revising your keyword list annually.

4. Remedy duplicate content

Websites often inadvertently create duplicate content, but it’s important to recognize duplicate content and indicate to Google which version of the content you want to be displayed in organic search results. There are three common culprits I find on university websites that create duplicate content: secure protocol, URL parameters, and blogs.

Google has indicated that using secure protocol can give a website a slight edge in the organic search rankings, so many sites have already implemented it. However, some sites forget to redirect the nonsecure version (HTTP) to the secure version (HTTPS). HTTP and HTTPS appear as two different URLs to Google; thus, if it finds both versions, then both may be indexed and ranked, creating duplicate content.

Another problem with URLs is parameters. Here’s an example of JMU’s donation page:

Notice how the URL is the same except for the “dids” parameter. Google identifies each URL with a unique parameter as a unique page. In this case, JMU is using the dids parameter to determine the program that the donor specifies that the donation is given to. It’s the same page with just the donation recipient changed. Dids 288 is the Future Fund while 188 is Finance and Business Law Department Endowment and 426 is the Wolla Scholarship.

This can become a problem if one of these URLs ranks above all others; it could unfairly skew how donations are received by various recipients. By identifying parameters to exclude in the Google Search Console, this problem can be easily fixed, or even avoided altogether.

Blogs, too, can lead to duplicate content. Take this example from UVA’s Darden School of Business. Darden has 10 blogs — some run by the school, some by professors, and some by students. Sometimes blog posts might be copied and used on multiple blogs on the site because each blog has a unique audience, and a piece of content might resonate with multiple audiences. For example, a piece titled “UVA Darden Strategic CFO Roundtable Tackles Impact of Trump Administration First 100 Days on Business and Society” appearing on the Institute for Business in Society blog at Darden also appears on the news section of the Darden site, creating duplicate content:

In this case, the canonical tag should be used to identify the piece of content that should receive the SEO benefit and be the version ranked by Google.

5. Address page load speed

Page load speed is a ranking factor for Google and has been for many years. One of the more common issues affecting page speed is image size. It’s not uncommon for university websites to have multiple people adding content, including images, to the site. However, not everyone who is uploading images is also optimizing them for the page.

The example above shows two images. The image on the left is only 194 pixels wide. It’s the actual image size of the image file that loads on that page. The image on the right is 783 pixels wide and has a file size of 143K. If the image were resized to fit only the 194 pixels needed, the file size would be reduced by 88 percent.

Taking the extra step to resize images can go a long way to help improve page load time, and it’s something that university marketers often can control. Free online tools like Compressor.io can help you resize images quickly and easily without sacrificing image quality.

Also try Google’s newly revised Test My Mobile Site tool, which tells you how fast your mobile pages are loading and how you compare to others in your industry. Google will even send you a report with specific recommendations on what to fix to improve mobile page load speed.

6. Optimize your linking

Inbound links are typically the most difficult type of link to attain but can hold great value. Unfortunately, when sites are redesigned or degrees or programs are changed or removed, it can create broken links. External links that once pointed to a live page are now broken, and those inbound links are lost for SEO. Or are they?

I recently Read an article about link reclamation — reclaiming your broken inbound links. Link reclamation represents an incredible opportunity for many sites to regain valuable inbound links quickly by just fixing the broken links. What impact can it make? I recently ran a broken links report for Virginia Tech using Ahrefs. While Virginia Tech boasts nearly 8 million inbound links, it also has over 400,000 broken inbound links. By reclaiming its broken backlinks, Virginia Tech could increase its inbound links for SEO by 6 percent.

7. Measure, assess and understand SEO value

SEO requires a lot of effort and addresses many aspects of your site. How do you know if your efforts are resulting in positive outcomes? Analytics is a great place to start. It’s important to measure beyond the page view if you can and examine how organic traffic is responding to calls to action on your site. Set up goals and review how organic traffic meets those goals.

With university sites, it’s not uncommon to find many third-party tools, such as application processing, integrated with the website. In most cases, these third-party tools don’t allow for Google Analytics tracking code to be added to the pages within the tool, such as pages of the online application process.

Consider creating an event goal in Google Analytics to track when a visitor begins the application process and tracking a page view goal for the page the applicant returns to on your own site once the application is submitted. This will allow you to parse how many applicants start the application process and how many finish and even allow you to provide retargeting ads to those that do not initially complete the process.

Snapchat launches new features including Paperclips for links within Snaps

Snapchat launches new features including Paperclips for links within Snaps

Now, marketers and any content creators can add links to their Snaps.

Snapchat is taking a step that Instagram simply hasn’t, with new features on both its iOS and Android app that include allowing marketers and any content creators to add links to their Snaps.

The most notable announced feature is Paperclips, allowing users to attach websites to Snaps, simply by tapping the Paperclip button within the Vertical Toolkit and adding the URL. Users viewing the Snap can then swipe up to open the website in Snapchat’s built-in browser.

Until now, this feature was limited to paying advertisers; now, it’s open to the entire user base. Benefits include adding more commentary to a Snap or background information or simply letting the viewer know where they can learn more.

Of course, to avoid abuse of community guidelines, Snap has a number of safety tools and provides information about potential harm some links may do to a user’s system. Objectionable links can also be reported by viewers.

Other features announced include some funky new options, including backdrops which help Snaps stand out against an artistic background and voice filters to make your voice stand out.